CURRENT MOON

Busy day on the solstice this year [updated with APOD link]

The December solstice, shortest day of the year is tomorrow, December 21. At approximately 7:38 p.m. EST (2338 UTC), the Sun’s apparent motion in the sky will come to a standstill (Latin, solstitium).* That’s because it has finished its southward migration for the year, and from here until June old Sol will travel north. And as it [...] [...]

Full moon and equinox

Two images of last night’s full moon appear below. One was taken a few minutes before the equinox; the other was taken a few seconds after it. Can you tell which is which? (Hint: the moment at which the equinox occurs has no bearing on the appearance of the moon.) At the time these pictures [...] [...]

June solstice, or, the longest day

Today is the June solstice. That means that today, at 7:28 a.m. EDT, the Sun’s apparent motion in the sky will stop moving north, and start heading south. This is because we are at that point in our orbit around the Sun where the following image takes place: As you can see, the northern hemisphere [...] [...]

December solstice, or the shortest day

The December solstice, shortest day of the year is today, December 21. At approximately 12:47 p.m. EST (1747 UTC), the Sun’s apparent motion in the sky will come to a standstill (Latin, solstitium).* That’s because it has finished its southward migration for the year, and from here until June old Sol will travel north. And [...] [...]