Seabirds

  • Summer Time Is Beach time

    By / July 18, 2010

    Even though the summer sun can be quite hot here in Boca, in one respect we don’t have it nearly so bad as people who live farther north. Our maximum temperature is usually quite a bit cooler than the maximum in places like Washington, D.C. or New York. We may get warm sooner, and stay… Read more

  • Monterey Bay pelagic birding

    By / October 16, 2009

    I took a very brief business trip to California last week. Flew in late, had a late dinner at the best Chinese restaurant in the world (Golden Willow in Concord, if you’re curious). Met clients in the SF Bay area on Thursday morning, then drove down to Monterey for Friday morning meetings. The entire trip… Read more

  • The seabird syndrome

    By / October 1, 2009

    Tony Gaston’s Seabirds: A Natural History (Yale UP, 2004) is a book-length exploration of an idea that he calls the “seabird syndrome.” Based on the idea that feeding ecology in the marine environment is what drove the evolution of all seabirds, Gaston’s treatment ties together almost every aspect of seabird life that one can imagine…. Read more

  • Fish oil

    By / September 30, 2009

    First, thanks to all of you on Facebook for wishing me a happy birthday; I did indeed enjoy a wonderful day. Seeing all your good wishes brought a smile to my face; I understand that’s somewhat out of character for the traditional man turning 40. So be it. I’m smiling, so thanks, y’all! Now,¬†yesterday’s post… Read more

  • At sea with the birds

    By / September 24, 2009

    I’m getting ready for a pelagic trip in California in October, so I’ve raided the shelves at Broward County’s downtown library for reading material about seabirds. What I know so far: Seabirds have evolved various strategies for excluding/excreting the salt that is an inevitable part of a life spent at sea. The most familiar such… Read more

  • Sea and Coastal Birds of North America

    By / May 19, 2009

    Some interesting tidbits from Scott Leslie’s Sea and Coastal Birds of North America: A Guide to Observation, Understanding and Conservation. Nothing unusual, but nothing I’d thought of before either: Seabirds (gannets, alcids, cormorants) tend to bunch up for breeding, favoring crowded, but out-of-the-way sites. Shorebirds, on the other hand, disperse widely for breeding, but bunch… Read more

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